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Wordle: Print vs Digital

We now live in an age where technology has improved tremendously over the years and as a result, more and more text is going digital.  This may not necessarily be a good thing.  While technology offers some slight advantages, such as searching for articles, print ultimately gets the nod.  In this essay, I will offer undeniable evidence that reading the print version of the New York Times is in fact more productive than reading the digital version.

One advantage print offers is historical appeal and credibility. Imagine if mankind’s greatest writings were only in digital format rather than print.  Famous historical examples include, but are not limited to, works of Shakespeare, the U.S. Constitution and the Holy Bible.  Picture for a moment going to church and everyone pulls out their iPhone or laptops rather than a traditional Holy Bible.  Just because a piece’s language can be translated to digital text does not mean that it should.  Documents of such importance deserve better.

Another advantage print offers is the ability to read during leisure time.  For example, reading the New York Times while commuting on the train.  Pro-digital supporters would argue that readers still have access to the New York Times while on the train by using their laptops or phones.  This is true.  However, I commute on the train frequently and have seen people robbed for their valuable electronics.  Thus, purchasing a print version of the New York Times can actually save the reader from becoming a victim of violence and robbery.

Some would argue that the print version of the New York Times is too frail and complain that something as trivial as spilling their coffee can ruin their paper.  I propose that it would be a greater loss if the reader, in their attempt to acquire the digital version, were to spill coffee on their laptop as compared to spilling it on the print version.  If somebody spills coffee on a page, they can simply continue on to the next one whereas if somebody spills it on their computer they are looking at a hefty price for a replacement.  This point can be expanded to comparing dropping both.  Imagine reading the New York Times online, getting distracted and then dropping your expensive laptop on the ground and watching it break into pieces. On the other hand, it’s no problem picking up your print copy of the New York Times if you were to drop it.  Simply pick it up and you’re on your way.

Proponents of the digital version like to claim that they are helping to save the planet by “going green”.  In response to this, I would like to note that paper is a renewable resource.  The paper industry actually plants more trees than they harvest to create a sustainable resource for their product.  The papers used to make print newspapers are recyclable, as well.  The actual major causes of deforestation are to create land to grow crops, grazing land for farm animals and to create fuel.  Also, reflect for a second on how much electricity would be consumed if everyone had to read electronically.  What kind of impact would the need for creating this much electricity have on the environment?

Digital text has disadvantages as well.  Did your parents ever tell you not to sit close to the television?  Well, there’s a reason for that.  Staring at digital screens has been proven to put more of a strain on the readers’ eyes, diminishing sight. Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is a “condition resulting from focusing the eyes on a computer display for protracted, uninterrupted periods of time. Some symptoms of CVS include headaches, blurred vision, neck pain, fatigue, eye strain, dry, irritated eyes, double vision, polyopia and difficulty refocusing the eyes.”  Are you willing to sacrifice your sight for the sake of temporary convenience?

Also, there is a large amount of risk that directly accompanies the technology that is used for the digital version of the New York Times that a print consumer does not have to worry about.  These include malicious viruses, trojans and worms that attack the electronics that are used.  The consequences of an infection occurring include losing everything on your hard drive and possibly losing total functionality of your device.  Another risk that accompanies this technology is identity theft.  Registering private information online, such as credit card numbers, offers cyber criminals the opportunity to cause severe financial harm to consumers.  This risk associated with technology is not generally seen with print.

Another advantage of print is the temptation the internet offers while reading online.  An example of this is students who get distracted while doing their homework by opening the website Facebook. By getting distracted, the reader is not fully able to absorb the substance of the material.  As a result, instead of increasing efficiency, digital text in fact can have the opposite effect.

As explained above, print offers many advantages that digital text cannot.  While the digital version of the New York Times offers convenience, the disadvantages and problems that come with it outweigh this convenience. Technology can be useful; however, we should not allow our society to become completely dependent on it.


Works Cited

Rich, Motoko.”The Future of Reading- Literacy Debate: Online, R U Really Reading?” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 27 July 2008. Web. 11 Oct. 2010. <http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/27/books/27reading.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&gt;

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We now live in an age where technology has improved tremendously over the years and as a result, more and more text is going digital.  This may not necessarily be a good thing.  While digital text offers some slight advantages, printed text ultimately gets the nod.  In this essay, I will propose that reading the print version of the New York Times is in fact more productive than reading the digital version.

One advantage printed text offers that digital text does not is historical appeal and credibility. Imagine if mankind’s greatest writings were only in digital format rather than printed.  Take the Constitution of the United States, for example.  Just because a piece’s writing can be translated to digital text does not mean that it should.  Documents of such importance deserve better.

Another advantage printed text offers is the ability to read during leisure time.  For example, reading the New York Times while commuting on the train.  Pro-digital supporters would argue that readers still have access to the New York Times while on the train by using their laptops or phones.  This is true.  However, I commute on the train frequently and have seen people robbed for their electronics.  Thus, purchasing a print version of the New York Times can actually save the reader from becoming a victim of violence and robbery.

Some would argue that the print version of the New York Times is too frail and complain that something as trivial as spilling their coffee can ruin their paper.  I propose that it would be a greater loss if the reader, in their attempt to acquire the digital version, were to spill coffee on their laptop as compared to spilling it on the printed version.  If somebody spills coffee on a page, they can simply continue on to the next one whereas if somebody spills it on their computer they are looking at a hefty prince for a replacement.

Proponents of digital text like to claim that they are helping to save the planet by “going green”.  In response to this, I would like to note that paper is a renewable resource.  The paper industry actually plants more trees than they harvest to create a sustainable resource for their product.  The papers used to make newspapers are recyclable, as well.  The actual major causes of deforestation are to grow crops, create grazing land for farm animals and create fuel.  Also, reflect for a second on how much electricity would be consumed if everyone had to read electronically.  What kind of impact would the need for creating this much electricity have on the environment?

Digital text has disadvantages as well.  Did your parents ever tell you not to sit close to the television?  Well, there’s a reason for that.  Staring at digital screens has been proven to put more of a strain on the readers’ eyes, diminishing sight.  I don’t know about anyone else but I am not willing to sacrifice my sight and vision for the sake of temporary convenience.

Another disadvantage of digital text is the temptation the internet offers while reading.  An example of this is students who get distracted while doing their homework by opening the website FaceBook. By getting distracted, the reader is not fully able to absorb the substance of the material.  As a result, instead of increasing efficiency, digital text in fact can have the opposite effect.

As explained above, printed text offers many advantages that digital text cannot.  While the digital version of the New York Times offers convenience, the disadvantages and problems that come with it outweigh this convenience. Technology can be useful; however, we should not allow our society to become completely dependent on it.

 

Works Cited

Rich, Motoko.”The Future of Reading- Literacy Debate: Online, R U Really Reading?” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 27 July 2008. Web. 11 Oct. 2010. <http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/27/books/27reading.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&gt;

 

 

We now live in an age where technology has improved tremendously over the years and as a result, more and more text is going digital. For my argument/advocacy project, I am going to propose to my audience that reading the print version of the New York Times is more productive than the digital version.  I am going to discuss the advantages of printed text and how they outweigh perceived advantages of digital text.  One advantage printed text offers that digital text does not is historical appeal and credibility. Imagine if mankind’s greatest writings were only in digital format rather than printed.  Documents of such importance deserve better.  Just because a piece’s writing can be translated to digital text does not mean that it should. Another advantage printed text offers is the ability to read during leisure time.  For example, reading the New York Times while commuting on the train.  Digital text has disadvantages as well.  It has been proven to put more of a strain on the readers’ eyes, diminishing sight.  Another disadvantage of digital text is the temptation the internet offers while reading.  An example of this is students who get distracted while doing their homework by opening the website FaceBook. As a result, instead of increasing efficiency, digital text in fact can have the opposite effect. My intended audience for this project is readers of the New York Times who acquire their world news via the internet rather than print, more specifically those who are in the 18-24 year old age group.

 

 

In this collection of essays titled “Ditch Your Laptop, Dump Your Boyfriend”, successful graduate students offer that college is a time for self-discovery and opportunity. Each writer offers insight to students new to college life based on their past experiences. Several recommendations from these authors include exploring new aspects of life, involvement with school clubs and activities, taking advantage of internships, removing certain things from ones life and having a life outside of school as to not get consumed by your studies.

Tim Novikoff demonstrates his argument of getting involved by illustrating how that process led to the finding of his vision of being an entrepreneur.  He states that getting involved in clubs and activities, networking with peers of all different types of backgrounds and filling leadership positions in school helped his development as a professional.  Novikoff asserts that college is about getting exposed to new ideas and concepts.  This is seen when he states “Take classes in many different classes before picking your major.  Try lots of different clubs and activities.  Make friends with people who grew up much poorer than you, and others much richer.”  The writer here believes that this will result in a more well-rounded individual.

Aman Singh Gill suggests that given that most universities are research driven, it creates jobs for students in that assistants and aides are needed.  This, in turn, allows opportunities for undergraduate students to learn “new skills and invaluable experience”.  This advice if practiced can better prepare an individual for a professional work environment and allow students to start building their resumes.The last way Gill advocates research is by suggesting that in an age of information, research experience is important due to the fact that it shows you how the information is made.

Willie X. Lin and Evan LaLonde both argue the importance of remaining calm  and relaxed in such a stressful situation.  Lin notes how it’s important to “take time away from campus” because “if you spend all of your time on school grounds, then it becomes too easy for the criticism from an occasional unkind professor or the conflict with a roommate to take on a monstrous scale.” The writer here suggests that having a life outside of school helps keep life balanced.  LaLonde follows this thinking when comparing and contrasting how he felt when school started as compared to after getting settled it when he states “Relax and enjoy the ride.”

Christine Smallwood and Rebecca Elliot, the only women out of the writers, both contend that removing certain things from your life can produce beneficial results.  Smallwood states that if students remove electronics, such as the internet and phones, from their lives for a few hours a day they will be better able to read their textbooks.  Elliot, on the other hand charges that long distance relationships do not work out and recommends to the reader they dump their significant other.  “You should break up soon because you are likely to break up over Thanksgiving, anyway.  Both Smallwood and Elliot offer similar advice in that they recommend removal of something from students’ lives but differ in that the aspect to be removed with Smallwood is electronic whereas the item to be removed with Elliot in contrast is an actual person.

This article was directed towards college freshmen in order to assist in their transition to higher academia.  There is a level of credibility that is attempted to be made by having these pieces of writing done by current students who are far along in their studies in order to provide a persuasive edge to the reader.  Another targeted audience to note are parents, who are more likely to read the New York Times with the thought the information will be passed to the actual freshman student.

A common trait amongst Novikoff, Gill, Lin, LaLonde, Smallwood and Elliot is perseverance. Each one of the writers can recall their experiences of the beginning of the daunting four-year long challenge of college. This collection of articles offers undergraduate students confirmation that success in college is obtainable by having graduate students, who have already earned degrees, as the writers. By having multiple authors write different pieces, “Ditch Your Laptop, Dump Your Boyfriend”, also has an unwritten message to the reader that his or her individual collegiate experience will be different and unique.  This approach primes the readers’ minds so that they anticipate this in their own real life dealings.  It stresses, however, that if good habits are practiced and the students puts forth effort, success can be achieved.


Works Cited:

Novikoff, Tim, Willie X. Lin, Aman Singh Gill, Christine Smallwood, Evan LaLonde, and Rebecca Elliot. “Ditch Your Laptop, Dump Your Boyfriend.” The New York Times 26 Sept. 2010, National ed., Sunday Opinion sec.: 12. Print

In this collection of essays titled “Ditch Your Laptop, Dump Your Boyfriend”, successful graduate students offer that college is a time for self-discovery and opportunity. Each writer offers insight to students new to college life based on their past experiences. Several recommendations from these authors include exploring new aspects of life, involvement with school clubs and activities, taking advantage of internships, removing certain things from ones life and having a life outside of school as to not get consumed by your studies.

Tim Novikoff demonstrates his argument of getting involved by illustrating how that process led to his finding his vision of being an entrepreneur.  He states that getting involved in clubs and activities, networking with peers of all different types of backgrounds and filling leadership positions in school helped his development as a professional.  Novikoff asserts that college is about getting exposed to new ideas and concepts.  This is seen when he states “Take classes in many different classes before picking your major.  Try lots of different clubs and activities.  Make friends with people who grew up much poorer than you, and others much richer.”  The writer here believes that this will result in a more well-rounded individual.

Aman Singh Gill suggests that given that most universities are research driven, it creates jobs for students in that assistants and aides are needed.  This, in turn, allows opportunities for undergraduate students to learn “new skills and invaluable experience”.  This advice if practiced can better prepare an individual for a professional work environment and allow students to start building their resumes.The last way Gill advocates research is by suggesting that in an age of information, research experience is important due to the fact that it shows you how the information is made.

Willie X. Lin and Evan LaLonde both argue the importance of remaining calm  and relaxed in such a stressful situation.  Lin notes how it’s important to “take time away from campus” because “if you spend all of your time on school grounds, then it becomes too easy for the criticism from an occasional unkind professor or the conflict with a roommate to take on a monstrous scale.” The writer here suggests that having a life outside of school helps keep life balanced.  LaLonde follows this thinking when comparing and contrasting how he felt when school started as compared to after getting settled it when he states “Relax and enjoy the ride.”

Christine Smallwood and Rebecca Elliot, the only women out of the writers, both contend that removing certain things from your life can produce beneficial results.  Smallwood states that if students remove electronics, such as the internet and phones, from their lives for a few hours a day they will be better able to read their textbooks.  Elliot, on the other hand charges that long distance relationships do not work out and recommends to the reader they dump their significant other.  “You should break up soon because you are likely to break up over Thanksgiving, anyway.  Both Smallwood and Elliot offer similar advice in that they recommend removal of something from students’ lives but differ in that the aspect to be removed with Smallwood is electronic whereas the item to be removed with Elliot in contrast is an actual person.

This article was directed towards college freshmen in order to assist in their transition to higher academia.  There is a level of credibility that is attempted to be made by having these pieces of writing done by current students who are far along in their studies in order to provide a persuasive edge to the reader.  Another targeted audience to note are parents, who are more likely to read the New York Times with the thought the information will be passed to the actual freshman student.

Works Cited:

Novikoff, Tim, Willie X. Lin, Aman Singh Gill, Christine Smallwood, Evan LaLonde, and Rebecca Elliot. “Ditch Your Laptop, Dump Your Boyfriend.” The New York Times 26 Sept. 2010, National ed., Sunday Opinion sec.: 12. Print.

Cowen, Tyler. “Can the Fed Offer A Reason to Cheer.” The New York Times19 Sept. 2010, National ed., Sunday Business sec.: 5. Print.

In this article, the author suggests the Federal Reserve increase inflation in hopes the American public will spend their money rather than save it and therefore stimulate our nation’s economy. Cowen demonstrates this by claiming if prices were to rise by 3% per year, consumers would be forced to spend their money or else it would be worth 3% less a year. The purpose of this article was to present an economic strategy in order to change current policies in place. This article was directed towards an economically inclined audience, specifically monetary policy makers.

Rhetorical Precis

In this essay, the editors suggest that for-profit colleges are unfairly targeting students and taking advantage of individuals through the financial process.  The author(s) demonstrate this by illustrating how students have been encouraged to falsify documents and sign contracts without financial advice.  The purpose of this article is to bring attention to the reader questionable practices that are being followed by for-profit universities in order to protect students from being taken advantage of.  This essay is aimed towards an audience that is involved with for-profit universities.

Unknown.  “Let The Students Profit.” New York Times 12 Sept. 2010: Page 10.  Print.